Balance therapy

I have had doctors both recomend and not recommend balance therapy. I will admit that the only reason that I have not tried it at all was from what others have said about it making them worse for a couple to a few weeks. Well, back then I was working and I was using ALL of my sick time and vacation time for when I was to dizzy too work, and I couldn’t afford taking weeks off from work with no vacation or sick time. I’m not working now, so I have no excuse.

So far, all that I have done is the first part of the evaluation. It was kind of fun talking to the therapist because she actually knew what I was talking about and referring to. It’s is always nice to describe your condition to people and not get a blank look. I do have to chuckle though watching them all panic each time I fell, at the desk, three times on the very short walk to the back, and then there were the falls during the actual session. :lol: )

My only problem with the therapy is that it is located on the sixth floor of the hospital. An elevator ride is pretty much required, and I don’t do elevators! The start and stop for a non-stop trip from the first floor to the sixth floor is bad enough, but when it has to stop at every floor… :evil: Depending on what direction the elevator is travelling, I either feel like I am being thrown up in the air or slammed to the ground. Either way, it triggers a dizzy spell and ruins my day.

At least the therapist is almost guarenteed to see me in a bad state, and has something to work with. :shock:

Does closing your eyes in elevators help?

If the balance work is like what my PT offered, you’ll learn it in a few sessions–and then it’s up to you to practice, if you get value from it. I was advised to go 3X a day, not that I’ve stuck with all of that.

I encourage you to work on using stairs, taking your time as needed, holding on to the railing, . . . but working your muscles. I lost so much fitness and thus morale whilst feeling incapacitated, the way you describe.

I’m glad you will try balance therapy. I don’t think it will hurt you in the long run and you may actually learn some tools that might help you with your balance and walking. Six flights is a lot. Maybe you could make an appt. for a quiet time of the day and only go on an empty elevator. Perhaps you could ask the therapist to meet you downstairs and accompany you on the ride up, asking other passengers to wait for another elevator. Sometimes the staff has a key which “takes over” the elevator for special medical situations; however, not sure that this will classify as one. Good luck with therapy. Kristen

— Begin quote from "david shapiro"

Does closing your eyes in elevators help?

If the balance work is like what my PT offered, you’ll learn it in a few sessions–and then it’s up to you to practice, if you get value from it. I was advised to go 3X a day, not that I’ve stuck with all of that.

I encourage you to work on using stairs, taking your time as needed, holding on to the railing, . . . but working your muscles. I lost so much fitness and thus morale whilst feeling incapacitated, the way you describe.

— End quote

Closing my helps a little. I usually kneel in the corner with my eyes closed. This way I only feel like I am being thrown a couple of feet in the air instead of ten feet. :lol: