BPPV vs positional vertigo

In another post, Brian wrote, in part: I have positional vertigo, but it is not BPPV. I have been tested three times for BPPV and it always came up negative. I am just like you describe, can’t lay flat on my back, can’t look up quickly, can’t say anything about having my hair washed at the salon, but the idea of that head position makes my stomach want to crawl up my throat. I also can’t turn my head to quickly, or come up from a bent over position to quickly.

What’s the difference between BPPV & positional vertigo? I thought they were the same thing. I’ve had vertigo come on ‘spontaneously’ as well as after exertion and/or after the activity Brian describes (i.e., looking up quickly or coming up from a bent-over position too quickly).

BPPV is a particular “disease” (lacking a better word), like labyrinthitis, migraine etc. Positional vertigo is just a symptom, vertigo that occurs in certain positions/when changing positions, like rolling over in bed - usually no matter what causes it. :slight_smile:

But what’s the difference? Why wouldn’t a person who experiences bouts of positional vertigo be diagnosed as having BPPV?
(AND do I have too much time on my hands today? :roll: )

— Begin quote from "joy"

But what’s the difference? Why wouldn’t a person who experiences bouts of positional vertigo be diagnosed as having BPPV?
(AND do I have too much time on my hands today? :roll: )

— End quote

I’m not too knowledgeable is this area, so keep that in mind… :wink:
Having that said… I think it doesn’t go as BPPV if the test(s?) (the “Dix-Hallpike” for one, not sure if there are others) is negative, and/or the Epley maneuvre doesn’t help the problem.
Also, BPPV is explicitly when crystals are on the loose in the ear canals, but other things can cause similar symptoms.

Hope that helps :slight_smile:

Okay … I think I get it now … thanks for your patience with me. I feel like I’ve dropped out of a “Night of the Living Dead” remake today. Bad cold, foggy, tired, snotty (literally & figuratively).

BPPV is a desease involving the “crystals” in your ear getting dislodged and “stuck” in the wrong position. It can be treated with some relatively simple therapy involving quickly moving the head and the body in different positions in order to dislodged those crystal, allowing them to move back to the proper position, or absorbed by the inner ear.

Because the testing always comes up negative for me, I am told that these manuvers won’t help. From what I understand, the positional vertigo related to MAV is caused by either the blood vessels near the inner constricting or the muscles near the inner ear constricting. Either case, they put pressure on the inner ear restricting proper flow of the fluids in the inner ear, thereby causing positional problems.

BTW, don’t get me wrong I’ve read that positional vertigo problems like mine or BPPV can be associated with MAV. The doctors seem to still be trying to decide on this topic.

Brian