Dizzy basketball player

It can happen to anyone, from last night’s Celtic’s/Cavalier’s games–from Cleveland.com

The Cavaliers’ starting lineup for tonight’s Game 3 might lose some veteran defensive punch, but it won’t lose anything in hair volume.

Forward Ben Wallace is doubtful against Boston after testing Friday at the Cleveland Clinic revealed he has a viral left inner ear infection and allergies. If Wallace does not play, Cavaliers coach Mike Brown said Anderson Varejao would start in place of Wallace – with his head of springy curls replacing Wallace’s trademark 'fro.

Wallace left Game 2 in Boston 3:40 into the first quarter, complaining of dizziness. He stumbled off-balance as he left the court, and had to lie prone on the bench for several minutes. He did not return to the game, and said afterward he thought allergies were the culprit.

kira

cbc.ca/sports/story/2002/08/ … 20802.html

Needless to say, he got it under control. Amazing athleticism if you watch most/or all of the video.

uk.youtube.com/watch?v=UkUlsl6ZhJs

Interesting that he’s been diagnosed with migraines, viral neuritis and Meniere’s–per the news. Continues to give credence to the overlap concept. Hopefully an amazing athlete can compensate.
Kira

— Begin quote from “kira”

Interesting that he’s been diagnosed with migraines, viral neuritis and Meniere’s–per the news. Continues to give credence to the overlap concept. Hopefully an amazing athlete can compensate.
Kira

— End quote

Wasn’t the same guy, thankfully (for him at least!). :slight_smile:

Same guy: there’s been reports that the Cleveland clinic said he had viral neuritis, and this other news report said that he’s had migraines all year, and Mayo clinic said he has Meniere’s. He had to pull of the last game with acute dizziness.
Just goes to show that more than one thing can exist in any of us, and that the diagnosis of dizziness is challenging: is it just MAV or Meniere’s or did he have a new bout of viral neuritis the other night. And people with migraine get BPPV 7.5 x more than the general population…
kira

— Begin quote from “kira”

Same guy: there’s been reports that the Cleveland clinic said he had viral neuritis, and this other news report said that he’s had migraines all year, and Mayo clinic said he has Meniere’s. He had to pull of the last game with acute dizziness.
Just goes to show that more than one thing can exist in any of us, and that the diagnosis of dizziness is challenging: is it just MAV or Meniere’s or did he have a new bout of viral neuritis the other night. And people with migraine get BPPV 7.5 x more than the general population…
kira

— End quote

Hmm, OK then. I figured it was someone else since MSDXD linked to another guy :slight_smile:

It is a different person. Just another example of an athlete with a similar ailment.

Tranquility, you’re right–I don’t really follow basketball, so I didn’t even read and know the names–I just heard about it from my husband ( a Celtic’s fan). The Cavaliers’ player has viral neuritis right now, is not expected to play again. The other person has migraines and meniere’s.
Two different players, both dizzy, two different diagnoses–I was a bit confused how the Cleveland player suddenly went to Mayo Clinic…
Sorry for the confusion, thanks for pointing out the mistake.
Kira

One thing to consider with both players: Both ended up going to two of the absolute elite hospitals very early for diagnosis. In my opinion, this decreases the likelihood of a change in diagnosis over time, and gives them a much better chance at remission than many who have been unfortunate enough to bounce from doctor to doctor for a relatively long time with multiple changes in diagnosis.