Drugs for MAV

Verapamil, Effexor, SSris, klonopin, topamax… in fact almost anything called a “brainmedication” seems to be tossed at this illness by docs. How can one distinct disorder have such a multitude of possible treatment-options???

How can one distinct disorder have such a multitude of symptoms?

Not being a smart arse but I think that’s the answer.

Vic

With all the symptoms - I find it unbelieveable that there is any ONE medication that will take care of not only my inner ear loss by my MAV as well (assuming, of course, that this winds up being MAV).

I think we’re all on this great quest to find as few meds as possible that will take care of as many symptoms possible with as little side-effects as possible.

It’s…possible. :wink:

Victoria,
Well stated!

I think with illnesses involving brain chemistry (along with other illnesses… diabetes, hypertension) there is not one size fits all for treatment. Many of the psychiatric illnesses such as depression, OCD, schizophrenia, etc. come readily to mind in that it sometimes takes many, many med trials and combos of meds to get patients to feel better.

Our illness is just so devastating in that, at least for me, it feels like my mind is very intact in a body that won’t let me live my life, move about this world freely…

Lisa

Yes I guess it might be the same way with other neurological illnesses. Answering a question with another question though… ! :stuck_out_tongue:
What does all of these disorders that need many types of treatment have in common? They are not very well understood at all… What is then the basis for calling one thing a distinct disorder and not various similar disorders? What I’m asking here is whether coining disorders too readily without enough to support the claim that they are one and the same, slows down scientific progress.

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Our illness is just so devastating in that, at least for me, it feels like my mind is very intact in a body that won’t let me live my life, move about this world freely…

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I know this feeling very much and it is a very lonely feeling :frowning:

Hi Mikael

I did answer a question with a question (I guess I could be a politician?) but it was rhetorical so I think that lets me off the hook. :lol:

I’m not sure MAV is a distinct condition. My understanding is that it is a variation of migraine or manifestation of migraine, but that either way, it falls in the migraine “bucket”. My neurologist agreed that my vertigo was associated with migraine but he said I was in a “cycle of migraine”. While I didn’t question him further (time of course is a factor in these consultations) my understanding is that migraines traditionally have an arc, so to be constantly symptomatic may mean being in a cycle of migraines, that is, back to back, so in effect, constant.

As for medications - well, I guess the myriad symptoms we all have may suggest that different parts of the brain are being affected, let alone allowing for normal variances among brains. So more than one drug may be required to treat across the MAV population. In the same way that “depression” is a distinct condition there are a number of anti-depressants, even within classes eg tri-cyclics, SSRIs and so on.

Just my two cents worth,
Victoria

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My neurologist agreed that my vertigo was associated with migraine but he said I was in a “cycle of migraine”.

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This would make sense for me - once I read some books on migraine after my diagnosis - I found that I have had every form of migraine out there - just at different times in my life. As early as 6th grade. What a joy I have been!!! My family and I all agree that at least we know what is wrong with me. We thoguht I was just prone to illness before. But now it has a name.

Candy

thank you for your answer Victoria, it makes sense to me :slight_smile:

I just wonder what the scientific reason for calling these disorder one and the same is, if the spectrum of both symptoms and treatment (and thus probably underlying cause to SOME DEGREE) are so various. Maybe I got it all wrong when I thought migraine was supposed to be something very distinct; maybe it’s not equivalent to some other typical disease/disorder like say vestibular neuritis.

My understanding is that migraine is a distinct condition but with different variants and different symptoms. I may be off base here but perhaps a similar example would be Multiple Sclerosis - there are different variants eg remitting, progressive and so on, and the symptoms (regardless of the variant) cover a very wide spectrum.

I think the common element with all these brain diseases is the vast array of symptoms. Given how large and crinkly human brains are perhaps that is not so surprising.

With migraine specifically, my neurologist did make the point that they do change over time (not sure why but lots of things about being human change over time. I call it “ageing” :wink: ).

For we migraineurs I think both these things (wide variety of symptoms and the changing over time) are particularly frustrating. Not that we need the frustration as the symptoms themselves are really unpleasant and frustrating enough already.

The neurosciences must be an interesting field of study - so much is undiscovered! :roll:

Victoria

The first thing they teach you in medical school is that “MEDICINE IS AN ART, NOT A SCIENCE”…
This phrase is used throughout medical schools all over the states. I think we are all learning first hand how true this is.

In fact, there is a word in medicine that we use all the time… IDIOPATHIC… and it’s the way docs say “I have no friggin’ idea of the cause”…lol… but at least it makes us sound smart while saying it… :lol:

Believe me, I wish I had a better answer and solution to our most frustrating and variable illness.

Best,
Lisa

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IDIOPATHIC… and it’s the way docs say “I have no friggin’ idea of the cause”.

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That was great Lisa … so true.

I like the analogy of how depression is treated. Same illness but can require numerous drug trials to get it sorted. Seems like it’s the just the way it is with neurological illnesses. If only migraine had one simple cause and one simple solution to stop it in everyone.

Scott