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Exercise - gym

I have been feeling better taking Ami, so I decided to join up at the gym again, I’ve done 3 sessions, taking it pretty easy some treadmill and cross trainer, only 30 mins each time, but I think my symptoms have flared a bit, had more dizziness back again. Do you think it could be related to the gym? Is it a bad decision? Can anyone else excercise? It brings in back pain for me too, I think the dizziness is coming from my back/neck problems. I don’t know, feeling a bit hopeless today

Hi Jess

It likely it could have exacerbated your symptoms for sure. I was training 4/5 times a week 60min sessions and pushing myself weight training too, it did make things more uncomfortable. I dont use the cross trainer as a rule because bouncing up and down is a no no! My brain is just getting used to walking on the treadmill again🙄

Can I ask what mg Amitriptyline you’re taking?perhaps take a break until your thresholds are higher? Or maybe cut back and just do 15mins at the gym for this period?

:full_moon_with_face:

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Thank you! I’m taking 35mg , tonight I’ve decided to go up to 40mg. I felt fine directly after the gym, but the next day or so I’m sure my symptoms increased, mainly the visual dizziness. It’s funny I went to the gym about 5 years ago before MAV, and every time I got off the equipment id have a floaty weird feeling, it was obviously brewing long ago :fearful:

Absolutely. Don’t much believe in coincidence with this MAV Beast. No doubt many will shoot me down in flames for this but I believe it’s far too strenuous for active MAV. Certainly the type of MAV I’ve got. The eminent Dr S doesn’t recommend it. I think he’s quite restrictive on the exercise front. Most recommend daily walking outside. Mine certainly did. Besides it seems silly to me to be exposing oneself to some many triggers too early on

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I’ve done 3 sessions, taking it pretty easy some treadmill and cross trainer, only 30 mins each time,
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Think about it a minute. ‘Pretty easy’ on who? Not on your senses. Not as strenuous as you did pre-MAV for sure but, and I know you suffer light sensitivity and visual vertigo, so being in a gym environment isn’t easy on the senses. It’s as bad as the supermarket in terms of triggers, worse in fact because you’ve thrown unaccustomed (these brains don’t like change, they like routine) physical exercise into a supermarket setting.

Delayed reactions, always infuriating because you think you’ve ‘got away with it’ and find out too late you’ve haven’t (been there so many times), are so very common.

If you think of MAV as a variant balance disorder, the clue is there in the word ‘balance’. Poor balance equals poor posture and vice versa. Poor posture exercising equals back pain, neck and probably every other spine related pain. Did this myself a while back trying to be Step Ups at home. Agony getting in/out a chair for days.

Perhaps long walks in nature, increased activity around the home, hurrying up/down the stairs or even bit home-made gym type exercise if you must and build it up very slowly. What you gotta remember is the Ami’s trying to control the symptoms. It’s not a cure. Helen

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Oh Helen you make so much sense! Thank you. The weird thing was I felt fine in the gym, it didn’t seem to be very brightly lit, and so if course thought I’d gotten away with it, but alas I don’t think I have. :roll_eyes::expressionless: I felt enormous fatigue after it also even though I didn’t feel I was going fast or anything. I was very undecided about whether to give it a go again, maybe it was too soon

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I’ve had lots of years to work it through. Getting quite used to being in my brain’s shoes so to speak I guess.

Ah, the dratted Delayed Reaction thing. Gets me very time too. So hard to know how far you can push with that. By the time you discover, its too late. Yep you’ll probably feel OK at the time, the Ami’s working but it builds up in your system the sensory stuff.

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Moderate, regular exercise makes me feel much better overall. My VRT told me the trick is paying attention to how you feel. Never let any symptom get more than 20% worse than when you walked in. And with everything MAV, build up slowly.

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Jess – I was a regular gym rat before my symptoms went out of control. I tried to continue my exercise routine but after twice experiencing major vertigo attacks at the gym, it became obvious that it isn’t a healthy place for me. I believe it’s the gym itself – the harsh lighting, clanging weights, blaring music, class instructors using microphones to shout instructions – that does me in. Most gyms are not set up to accommodate people with vestibular disorders.

Maybe it’s too soon for you to return to the gym. That doesn’t necessarily mean you’ll never be able to go again. In the meantime, try to focus on what you CAN do, rather than what you can’t do. Personally, I love to walk and that has become my primary means of exercise. I also take yoga classes, although I have to modify poses quite a bit. See if you can find activities you actually enjoy. Start slow and be patient with yourself. It’s a challenging lifestyle change so hang in there.

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I find that outdoor exercise was more tolerable when I was bad - walking, cycling was easier for me than gym - although I found yoga/tai chi extremely good as it seemed to help reset my brain a bit. I would recommend that rather than pounding in the gym until you are more better…
hope that helps!

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I keep vacillating between jogging and walking. It seems that jogging seems to make MAV flare a bit more in the proceeding days, but overall I feel healthier and sleep better. So I’m never quite sure what to do, but I always at least do walking.

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Jess, everything that I’m reading you say sounds exactly like me. When I had my famous ‘jog’ about a year ago I felt enormous fatigue and floatiness and couldn’t move the rest of the day. Since then have not done any vigorous exercise other than an up hill walk. My functional GP says my adrenals are exhausted and that vigorous exercise is not good for me and major fatigue is a sign my body isn’t ready. From what I understand, the adrenals take a long time to recover and the only way to support them is through low stress on body and mind as well as healthy lifestyle choices. The adrenals function in directly relationship with the thyroid, so there’s that link too, and you’re not currently being treated for your hashimotos.

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Yes we do sound so similar. I’m sure my adrenals are also burnt out. 2 years ago when chronic MAV hit, I had various practitioners tell me my nervous system was exhausted. I have often wondered whether the adrenals can cause or contribute to MAV. I’m thinking my body just isn’t ready for exercise either, Ive stacked on so much weight and feel so unfit, I was vainly hoping exercise might help. When MAV hit I was exhausted and got a neck injury which tipped me over the edge. I had my thyroid checked regularly but no doctors thought I needed medication. I will get it checked again and I wouldn’t be surprised it will show a problem. Thank you for posting your story, and sorry you have suffered so much

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I do hope you find some good support soon. I don’t know what’s it’s like in Australia, but in the UK the NHS doesn’t test T3 and antibodies as standard with thyroid, but they are so important! Btw, my antibodies have gone right down since my treatment. One thing I’ve learnt is that the whole thing is a process and I also wholeheartedly believe that if we focus on straightening out everything that might be ‘off’ in our bodies/minds then that will have a much better long term effect than just treating the symptoms of MAV. Sending lots of healing vibes

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Currently my doctors and I don’t know yet if I have Vestibular migraines or POTS. But I wanted to share my similar experiences. I have a gym membership and a personal trainer. I often experience dizziness/fullness and ringing in left ear at the beginning of my workouts ( they often don’t happen if I drink a liter of water before a workout) I do both cardio and weights. The episodes seem less likely if I warm up very slowly for 7-10 minutes. I wanted to share what my trainer has taught me, in the best way I can. First of all, it sounds like some of you are pushing too hard and aggravating your nervous system. Weights don’t get your heart rate up as high, it might be easier for you than cardio. Also doing mild cardio is better for fat burn than high intensity and less stress on your nervous system. 60 minutes in the gym may be overdoing it for someone with a condition like this. These are some things to research. I will share a bit about my adrenaline issues: I experienced something extremely scary and traumatic (a life and death situation) I never got counseling or meds. I experienced strong adrenaline surges daily for years, along with pretty extreme PTSD. I honestly believe this is what caused my symptoms that I now have. 15 years after my experience, I am on the road to recovery mentally but it took a toll on my body. I appear physically fit and healthy but I don’t know if my body will ever be the same. Despite this, I believe it’s best to keep moving, I will build strength in my body one muscle fiber at a time until This illness no longer defines me. I don’t believe not being active will do a bit of good. The human body was meant to be in motion, and typically inactivity just leads to more illness.

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Exactly!

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I know the first doctor who diagnosed hashimotos tested, the T4, TSH, T3 and antibodies. I’m not sure whether was all done again last time, but the last time I had the antibodies checked they had gone right down without medication. However obviously now it’s a different story, I will ask to get them all checked again

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