Is depression linked to MAV?

Hi Everyone,

I just have a quick question for all of you.
How many of you experienced depression prior to getting MAV? and how many of you where on SSRI/SNRI prior to getting MAV?
I battle depression in my teens and went on meds, but it got better later on.
I read somewhere that there might be a link between the two. However, I asked Dr. Hain about it and he doesn’t think so…
What do you guys think?

Emma

I for one did not suffer depression until the vertigo hit, yes I had good times and bad times but NOTHING like this. I used to be very independant now I need someone to walk me to the bathroom a lot of time, very depressing!

Hi Em,

There’s a fair bit of data out there showing how closely related migraine and depression are – probably because they can both be the result of some unusual brain chemistry. This from Psychology Today:

— Begin quote from ____

Throbbing migraine headaches and major depression may be related. In fact, having one may increase the occurrence of the other.

Migraine sufferers were five times more likely than headache-free individuals to develop major depression in a study conducted by the Henry Ford Health System. Those who started the study with depression were three times more likely to develop migraines.

Study author Naomi Breslau and colleagues also found that a person with major depression was more at risk of suffering a first-time migraine than non-depressed individuals. And people who live with migraines seem to be more at risk for an initial bout of depression.

Breslau interviewed 496 adults who had a history of migraines, 151 people with severe headaches and 539 people without headache problems. The study followed them for two years.

The authors conclude that both disorders are biologically linked, possibly with brain chemicals or hormones. They suggest that treatment for one should look for the presence of the other.

— End quote

Scott

I wouldn’t say depression, but I had other problems. I was underweight most of my life (between perhaps 6-16 years old, with a relapse thanks to MAV later) - not from any particular eating disorder, more a “idiopathic” lack of appetite. Then, for some reason, I delevoped pretty severe anxiety and was put on an SSRI (Prozac) around age… um… 16-17? - 22.5 now.
I was on it for a few years, but started to get worse (MAV slooowly creeping in I think, in hindsight), and we tried increasing the dose to 60mg, and things got worse yet, so I quit it, and also quit school a few months earlier (which quite frankly sucked bigtime, for the first time ever I was actually having fun in school, and that is unlikely to happen again…).

Med-free but also mostly life-free from Nov '06 to May '07 when I restarted another SSRI due to much worse anxiety, Lexapro this time around. This made things even worse, and Remeron (again, anxiety - the lexapro didn’t exactly help and I got insomnia), 1 month later again worse yet… I’ve been housebound since since the day before Remeron :? - although I did get progressively worse the first few days to 1-2 weeks on it and actually called and asked to stop it two or three times… in hindsight, again, I wish I’d ignored “doctor’s orders” and quit while I still could have done so easily.

So, yeah, not a bit fan of those meds right now. Who knows, I might have been way better off now if I hadn’t started one in the first place.
I’m still on Remeron and amitriptyline (the latter tried as a migraine preventative), both of which increase at least noradrenaline, and likely also serotonin (some have started to doubt if remeron has serotonin-increasing effects or not), due to withdrawal crap. Yup, med sensitive as hell.

I think we would all agree that MAV or any vestibular disorder causes great anxiety. Prolonged anxiety causes depression. So I know when I am having a bad few days, I feel like am in a “free fall” towards depression.

— Begin quote from “Joanmac”

I think we would all agree that MAV or any vestibular disorder causes great anxiety. Prolonged anxiety causes depression. So I know when I am having a bad few days, I feel like am in a “free fall” towards depression.

— End quote

I think that is a very accurate statement as many of us fall into that category after going through this for an extended period of time.

The way Dr Hain described it to me, is that I have reactive depression. In other words, the vestibular issues & MAV, basilar migraines,etc were not caused by depression, but I was depressed because I could no longer do the things I love: treat patients, walk my dog, hike, travel, camp, ride my bike, the list on, as it does for all of us. I have found that talking to a psychologist has been a tremendous help. He has gotten me through some really rough times.

Sometimes being deaf has its advantages. My pschychologist writes down his conversations for me. If he says something particularly brilliant I keep the page. He told me he measures his success by the number of pages I keep! He has a great sense of humor and sometimes just thinking of his goofy faces makes me laugh!

Claudia

My friend and I both find, on the day we have a bad migraine, we are usually depressed, then it lifts with the migraine (I think its to do with the low serotonin or something, somebody else may step in here and know about this).

Christine

— Begin quote from “caglenn”

The way Dr Hain described it to me, is that I have reactive depression. In other words, the vestibular issues & MAV, basilar migraines,etc were not caused by depression, but I was depressed because I could no longer do the things I love: treat patients, walk my dog, hike, travel, camp, ride my bike, the list on, as it does for all of us. I have found that talking to a psychologist has been a tremendous help. He has gotten me through some really rough times.

— End quote

Oh, what I’d give for a balance pro to state something to that to me - on a paper with a signature on it… My psych nurse (not sure about the psych himself), who I’m not really seeing atm, refuses to believe exactly what you said; I get anxious and depressed from HAVING this crap, not the other way around. He seems pretty damn confident in that if I started treating my anxiety (which is impossible as I’m housebound - no therapy - and already on meds), I would no longer be dizzy, etc. It’s all in my head…

I was diagnosed years ago with generalized anxiety disorder. Looking back on that time, I think it was this MAV not generalized anxiety disorder. Meds did not help at all. It just kinda burned out after about 6 months. I wasn’t as dizzy then as I am now, but more light headed, foggy brained type of feeling, But I think with menopause my MAV has evolved to more pronounced dizziness/imbalance/rocking/swaying.

— Begin quote from “Tranquillity”

— Begin quote from “caglenn”

The way Dr Hain described it to me, is that I have reactive depression. In other words, the vestibular issues & MAV, basilar migraines,etc were not caused

— End quote

by depression, but I was depressed because I could no longer do the things I love: treat patients, walk my dog, hike, travel, camp, ride my bike, the list on, as it does for all of us. I have found that talking to a psychologist has been a tremendous help. He has gotten me through some really rough times.
Oh, what I’d give for a balance pro to state something to that to me - on a paper with a signature on it… My psych nurse (not sure about the psych himself), who I’m not really seeing atm, refuses to believe exactly what you said; I get anxious and depressed from HAVING this crap, not the other way around. He seems pretty damn confident in that if I started treating my anxiety (which is impossible as I’m housebound - no therapy - and already on meds), I would no longer be dizzy, etc. It’s all in my head…

— End quote

Ain’t that the truth…it is in our heads but not the way they want to categorize it.