Mav and antihistamine

I was just wondering whether antihistamines were beneficial or detrimental with mav. I’m taking theralene 1 hour before bedtime to help me sleep.

My dizzies are mild most days, and when I tried valerian root it muted most of my symptoms; anyone else with mav had those results? Sorry for all these questions but I’m still in the dark as to what I have.

thanks!

/ Mikael - mdds or mav?

I don’t think they matter. I started the same med almost exactly a month ago (usually at 0.4 ml = 16mg), and I haven’t noticed much of a change except slightly better sleep.

Edit: For everybody else who may care, the active ingredient is alimemazine (aka trimeprazine).

I’ve wondered about antihistamines only because foods which release or are full of histamine are on the NO list. So I did some searching: nutramed.com/headache/migraineref.htm

**The clinical features of migraine as a manifestation of allergic disease.

Authors Wilson CW. Kirker JG. Warnes H. O’Malley M .

Source Postgraduate Medical Journal. 56(659):617-21, 1980 Sep.**

**Abstract ** Patients with a clinical history of migraine were evaluated psychiatrically, and by electroencephalography. They were challenged with food antigens by skin-prick test, and abdominal symptoms were evaluated following oral ingestion of food allergens. A significant correlation was found between challenge with specific food allergens and the development of migraine headaches, the appearance of abdominal symptoms and the occurrence of positive skin reactions. Psychiatric abnormalities and EEG alterations were associated with the occurrence of headaches and allergic clinical features. It is suggested that the clinical features of migraine can be explained as a result of release of chemical mediators following antigen-antibody reactions in the brain and other tissues where specific antibodies are localized. The continuous ingestion of the responsible food allergens would account for the raised tissue concentrations of noradrenaline, histamine and other mediators to which the clinical features of migraine are attributed.

**The role of antihistamine therapy in vascular headaches.

Authors Mansfield LE .

Institution Division of Immunology and Allergy, Texas Tech RHSC, El Paso 79902.

Source Journal of Allergy & Clinical Immunology. 86(4 Pt 2):673-6, 1990 Oct.**

Migraine (vascular) headache is a complex syndrome that involves vascular hyperreactivity. The functions of systemic mediators in migraine are not fully understood. It is unclear which mediators provoke this probably atopic disorder and which represent an attempt to correct an imbalance. However, it has been demonstrated fairly conclusively that increased histamine levels correlate with migraine attacks in susceptible persons. Recent studies showing that histamine seems to have many different receptors and to adopt different conformations for different receptors may serve as a useful guide to future scientific investigation. Further impetus may come from ongoing studies of H3 histamine receptors, which indicate that H3 agonists offer promise as prophylactic agents for people who suffer from vascular headaches.

Bold is mine - i should have just bolded that entire last abstract, hey?

And this was just the first hit i got.

I quit taking my antihistamines once the fall ended, i think i’ll start them again - can’t hurt!

Julie

Wait a minute, these were from 1980 and 1990, i guess they weren’t such good ideas after all

I gotta stop working and posting at the same time :oops:

I’m currently taking Allegra (antihistamine) and Singulair (anti leukotriene - probably misspelled that). My symptoms always get worse in the Fall and this year they have been much much less severe than last year. Now, is this because of the Allegra or the Verapamil or the treatment for sleep apnea or something else entirely? I have no idea. I just keep heaving hand gernades at this monster and hoping one of them will smack it down. The problem with this approach of course, is that when things do improve I’m never sure what’s responsible for the improvement.

Good luck

Chaz

— Begin quote from "MikaelHS"

I was just wondering whether antihistamines were beneficial or detrimental with mav.

— End quote

I tried antihistamines when I was experiencing ear fullness with my vertigo. Unfortunately, they didn’t help me with the ear fullness or the vertigo. They were neutral; they didn’t make my symptoms worse either.

I am MUCH worse during the pollen seasons, always have been, even before my crash.

Here’s a more recent study, 2001 that uses subcutaneous histamine

Here’s something I found in European Neurology 2008
content.karger.com/ProdukteDB/pr … /000115637

Background: Histamine has a selective affinity for H3 receptors and it may specifically inhibit the neurogenic edema response involved in migraine pathophysiology.
Objective: To evaluate the therapeutic potential of subcutaneous administration of histamine in migraine prophylaxis, compared with oral administration of topiramate.
Methods: Ninety patients with migraine were selected in a 12-week double-blind controlled clinical trial to evaluate the efficacy of subcutaneous administration of histamine (1-10 ng twice a week) compared with oral administration of topiramate (100 mg daily dose).
The variables studied were: headache intensity, frequency, duration, analgesic intake and Migraine Disability Assessment.
Results: The data collected during the 12 weeks of treatment revealed that headache symptoms improved in both the histamine and topiramate groups, which was evident within the first month after the initiation of treatment, with statistically significant (p < 0.001) reductions in headache frequency (50%), Migraine Disability Assessment score (75%), intensity of pain (51%), duration of migraine attacks (45%), as well as in the use of rescue medication (52%).

Conclusion: The present study provides evidence of the efficacy of subcutaneously applied histamine and orally administered topiramate in migraine prophylaxis. Subcutaneously applied histamine may represent a novel and effective therapeutic alternative in resistant migraine patients.

Copyright © 2008 S. Karger AG, Basel
E-Mail millanrebeca@hotmail.com
Published online: February 8, 2008

Julie

I tried antihistamines also, in the beginning, after my “crash”. All they did for me was sedate me. (which was not such a bad thing at the time).

They didn’t do anything for me as far as dizziness goes. I would say I’d reach for ibuprofen before I’d reach for the antihistamines. Thats just my opinion (or my experience rather).

Kim

I have tried phenergan, with minimal sucsess, helped me sleep better, that’s about it.
here’s what I found on this med you asked about.
jen

Indication
Used to prevent and relieve allergic conditions, which cause pruritus (itching) and urticaria (some allergic skin reactions).

Pharmacology
trimeprazine (also known as Alimemazine) is a tricyclic antihistamine, similar in structure to the phenothiazine antipsychotics, but differing in the ring-substitution and chain characteristics. Trimeprazine is in the same class of drugs as chlorpromazine (Thorazine) and trifluoperazine (Stelazine); however, unlike the other drugs in this class, trimeprazine is not used clinically as an anti-psychotic. It acts as an anti-histamine, a sedative, and an anti-emetic (anti-nausea). Trimeprazine is used principally as an anti-emetic, to prevent motion sickness or as an anti-histamine in combination with other medications in cough and cold preparations. Tricyclic antihistamines are also structurally-related to the tricyclic antidepressants, explaining the antihistaminergic adverse effects of these two drug classes and also the poor tolerability profile of tricyclic H1-antihistamines.

Mechanism of Action Trimeprazine competes with free histamine for binding at HA-receptor sites. This antagonizes the effects of histamine on HA-receptors, leading to a reduction of the negative symptoms brought on by histamine HA-receptor binding.
Absorption Well absorbed in the digestive tract.

Toxicity Symptoms of overdose clumsiness or unsteadiness, seizures, severe drowsiness, flushing or redness of face, hallucinations, muscle spasms (especially of neck and back), restlessness, shortness of breath, shuffling walk, tic-like (jerky) movements of head and face, trembling and shaking of hands, and insomnia.

Target 1 GO Classification Function
amine receptor activityhistamine receptor activitysignal transducer activityreceptor activitytransmembrane receptor activityG-protein coupled receptor activityrhodopsin-like receptor activity
Process
cellular processcell communicationsignal transductioncell surface receptor linked signal transductionG-protein coupled receptor protein signaling pathway
Component
cellmembraneintrinsic to membraneintegral to membrane

Target 1 General Function Involved in rhodopsin-like receptor activity
Target 1 Specific Function In peripheral tissues, the H1 subclass of histamine receptors mediates the contraction of smooth muscles, increase in capillary permeability due to contraction of terminal venules, and catecholamine release from adrenal medulla, as well as mediating neurotransmission in the central nervous system

·

— Begin quote from "Julie"

I am MUCH worse during the pollen seasons, always have been, even before my crash.

Here’s a more recent study, 2001 that uses subcutaneous histamine

Here’s something I found in European Neurology 2008
content.karger.com/ProdukteDB/pr … /000115637

Background: Histamine has a selective affinity for H3 receptors and it may specifically inhibit the neurogenic edema response involved in migraine pathophysiology.

Julie

— End quote

Hmm, that’s interesting :slight_smile:
Although I learned something new just yesterday: stimulating H3 receptors reduces histamine production. That’s not the only thing they do, of course, but still. I suppose it’s not impossible that they actually got a kind of antihistaminic effect that way, although it sounds weird.

I don’t quite get what they mean by “Histamine has a selective affinity for H3 receptors”… If it does, how come H1 and H2 receptors also exist and “work”? :?

pharmacorama.com/en/Sections/Histamin_2.php

This talks about H1 through 4, but i don’t know when it was written.

www3.interscience.wiley.com/jour … 1&SRETRY=0

And this one also talks about using histamine which has an affinity for H3 as a prophylaxis against migraine. I won’t post the entire thing here, it’s pretty redundant. Written in the Journal - Headache 2003

Okay, i’ll get off the histamine bandwagon now :slight_smile:

— Begin quote from "Tranquillity"

— Begin quote from "Julie"

I am MUCH worse during the pollen seasons, always have been, even before my crash.

Here’s a more recent study, 2001 that uses subcutaneous histamine

— End quote

Here’s something I found in European Neurology 2008
content.karger.com/ProdukteDB/pr … /000115637

Background: Histamine has a selective affinity for H3 receptors and it may specifically inhibit the neurogenic edema response involved in migraine pathophysiology.

Julie
Hmm, that’s interesting :slight_smile:
Although I learned something new just yesterday: stimulating H3 receptors reduces histamine production. That’s not the only thing they do, of course, but still. I suppose it’s not impossible that they actually got a kind of antihistaminic effect that way, although it sounds weird.

I don’t quite get what they mean by “Histamine has a selective affinity for H3 receptors”… If it does, how come H1 and H2 receptors also exist and “work”? :?

— End quote

I talked to Hain today. He said one of the other tricks he uses is betahistamine. I’m pretty sure he said we would have to get it outside the US. I told him about this study I found and he thought it was very cool! I sent him the link. He also didn’t understand the subcutaneous part. BTW, on the phone, we were talking about so many other things, I forgot to ask him about the dosage of ibuprofen, so I asked him in email. Hope he gets back to me.

Julie

I was prescribed Betahistine when I first became ill and I took it for a few weeks. It didn’t work.

Becky