Other than medications

Other than medications what would all say helps reduce your symptoms best or at least keeps them at bay?

I was reading somewhere earlier that people that have this seem to have a harder time in the winter months or when the weather changes.

What about diet changes? Your sleep cycles? etc. That is the questions I am asking, maybe w can all learn from each other at least some of the things we can control that may not cure the disease but will at least help it be more manageable.

For me the biggest help so far is my diet change. One thing I read earlier is that smoking can be a problem with the vertigo symptoms . What do you all think?

I do smoke but as nervous as I have been lately it has been hard for me to try and quit. I have at least cut down on them but the minute my anxiety gets bad it is hard.

Timeless,

Great topic! The one thing that makes the biggest positive difference for me is following a low-carb diet while also avoiding caffeine, MSG, nitrates, and aspartame. Getting 7-8 hours of sleep each night is also important - no more and no less.

Marci

— Begin quote from "MarciM"

Timeless,

Great topic! The one thing that makes the biggest positive difference for me is following a low-carb diet while also avoiding caffeine, MSG, nitrates, and aspartame. Getting 7-8 hours of sleep each night is also important - no more and no less.

Marci

— End quote

Marci, I too have found that the low-carb diet is a key not sure what the correlation is but it certainly helps, I started by just removing the trigger foods for migange and then determined I had some issues wiht sugars so have also cut them out , too.

All the simple sugars and simple carbs.

Is it not amazing what all has MSG in it never really know all the hidden words until I started reading labels. I have also cut out the caffeine and I really miss my coffee. The only thing I use for sweetener now is Stevia which is all natural. I am working on the sleep idea which I have a hard time with since I am a night owl. It is not a problem right now since I am out of work, but that will have to change when I return.

Hey Timeless,

I have been dealing with this condition for the past 16 years and what has benefited me most other than medicine is getting atleast 8 hours sleep and going to bed at approximatley the same time each night, reduced stress, and as far as diet goes reduce or completely stop caffeine, msg, alcohot, sugars and chocolate are big triggers for me. Oh yes…working part-time helps too. At this point i’m still not able to work a full-time job. I must keep my life very simple.

Joe

Besides meds, avoiding MSG has been the key for me. (I’m pretty sold on my supplements also - magnesium, feverfew and B-2).

Kim

— Begin quote from "Timeless"

I have also cut out the caffeine and I really miss my coffee. The only thing I use for sweetener now is Stevia which is all natural. I am working on the sleep idea which I have a hard time with since I am a night owl. It is not a problem right now since I am out of work, but that will have to change when I return.

— End quote

Yeah, the coffee has been a tough one for me. I gave it up cold turkey for a few months last spring when I was really sick. It made a difference. Then when I was feeling better after the Topamax fiasco, I started sneaking it back in. Some days I can drink it with no bad effects, other days it sends me spinning. My symptoms have worsened lately due primarily to weather, stress, and travel, so I am ditching the caffeine completely again and watching my diet more closely. By the way, I use Stevia too. Although, I don’t need nearly as much now that I don’t have coffee to put it in.

I too am a night owl by nature. I make myself go to bed at 11:00pm on weekdays and I get up around 6:30am to get ready for work. If I sleep less than 7 hours or more than 8 hours, I feel groggy and my symptoms are worse.

Others have found benefit in a low-carb diet too. I believe it works for me primarily for the following three reasons:

  1. It stabilizes blood sugar
  2. It eliminates many of the migraine trigger foods and chemicals
  3. It has a diuretic effect, which tends to make me feel better for some reason - maybe because it lowers blood pressure - I’m not sure

— Begin quote from "MarciM"

— Begin quote from "Timeless"

I have also cut out the caffeine and I really miss my coffee. The only thing I use for sweetener now is Stevia which is all natural. I am working on the sleep idea which I have a hard time with since I am a night owl. It is not a problem right now since I am out of work, but that will have to change when I return.

— End quote

Yeah, the coffee has been a tough one for me. I gave it up cold turkey for a few months last spring when I was really sick. It made a difference. Then when I was feeling better after the Topamax fiasco, I started sneaking it back in. Some days I can drink it with no bad effects, other days it sends me spinning. My symptoms have worsened lately due primarily to weather, stress, and travel, so I am ditching the caffeine completely again and watching my diet more closely. By the way, I use Stevia too. Although, I don’t need nearly as much now that I don’t have coffee to put it in.

I too am a night owl by nature. I make myself go to bed at 11:00pm on weekdays and I get up around 6:30am to get ready for work. If I sleep less than 7 hours or more than 8 hours, I feel groggy and my symptoms are worse.

Others have found benefit in a low-carb diet too. I believe it works for me primarily for the following three reasons:

  1. It stabilizes blood sugar
  2. It eliminates many of the migraine trigger foods and chemicals
  3. It has a diuretic effect, which tends to make me feel better for some reason - maybe because it lowers blood pressure - I’m not sure

— End quote

Below is an article I found when I was researching the reactive hypoglycemia which is what I feel like I have as it regards the sugar issues and when I read the reactions it can have it fit my symptoms to a tee. So I have tried to follow the advice and when I do it is much better as far as my symptoms are concerned. Another factor I have found is that making sure I drink plenty of water seems to have a positive effect. My symptoms have been worse the last few days and I think it is due to the weather, and stress. Plus on top of everything else I have a yeast infection (which I have not had one of those in years) but I had to take an antibiotic for a urinary tract infection so I am sure that is what triggered that problem. Doctor called me in some medication which I will pick up later today .

opinions3.com/reactive_hypoglycemia.htm

I have found that a strict sleep schedule, diet, and stress reduction help me. I keep my bed time about the same, only allowing about an hour variance come the weekend. I also can’t let myself sleep in, to much sleep will give me a headache, to little and I am dizzy. Diet: for me I have found over the years that I need to stay away from artificial ingrediants such as sweetners and MSG, I can’t touched smoked meats, and chocolate. Stress reduction, that’s the hard one, I use relaxation techniques similar to meditation, anything to relax the body so that I am not so tensed up.

Regarding the nicotine, I can say that it has been a while since I read anything regarding nicotine. I know it is not advised for meniere’s desease. I also know that back when I used to smoke, I would put up with the withdrawal when I was having a migraine because it the smoke would make the pain blow up. So, from personal experience, I would say that nicotine is probably a no-no.

Timeless,

Thanks for the link. I have suspected something like that is a big part of my problem. I have done some research on hypoglycemia before, but I have never run across this article. I too see myself in the article and the symptoms list. I plan to discuss it with my doctor on Friday. Have you ever done the glucose tolerance test?

Marci

— Begin quote from "MarciM"

Timeless,

Thanks for the link. I have suspected something like that is a big part of my problem. I have done some research on hypoglycemia before, but I have never run across this article. I too see myself in the article and the symptoms list. I plan to discuss it with my doctor on Friday. Have you ever done the glucose tolerance test?

Marci

— End quote

Just a lil’ something - I’ve seen several reports saying the glucose tolerance test isn’t reliable - it gives false positives.
Not sure how things are over there, but blood sugar meters are insanely cheap over here - the test strips are darn costly though.
I bought a meter with 10 strips, with everything you need, for about $6(!). Great way to confirm for yourself, when you’re feeling the symptoms.

— Begin quote from "Tranquillity"

Not sure how things are over there, but blood sugar meters are insanely cheap over here - the test strips are darn costly though.
I bought a meter with 10 strips, with everything you need, for about $6(!). Great way to confirm for yourself, when you’re feeling the symptoms

— End quote

I’ve thought about trying that just to see. I think I’ll check into it. Thanks!

— Begin quote from "MarciM"

— Begin quote from "Tranquillity"

Not sure how things are over there, but blood sugar meters are insanely cheap over here - the test strips are darn costly though.
I bought a meter with 10 strips, with everything you need, for about $6(!). Great way to confirm for yourself, when you’re feeling the symptoms

— End quote

I’ve thought about trying that just to see. I think I’ll check into it. Thanks!

— End quote

I have read about the test not giving you a good reading either, plus finding a doctor who will test for it and really understands it is another isuue.

What I did was bought the blood glucose meter and monitor mine every day. (three times a day)
I was already on the pretty strict diet when I started doing this but one morning we went out for breakfast and I had a cup of coffee (decaf) and I put the creamer that was on the table and a spoon of sugar in it.

Within about 30 minutes I started feeling a bit strange so I took it as soon as I got home. When I had taken it that morning it was 90 and by the time I got home it was 68 which is a big drop and it was from the half and half and the sugar I put in the coffee. I know it was becasue that is the only thing different I did that day.

I keep a very detailed journal everyday of what I do, what I eat, what medications I take, what supplements I take, so that I can see any patterns that make my symptoms worse of better.

I got mine for 9.99 and the strips were about 20.00. Walmart here has one called reli-on which their strips are cheaper than any of them. I am not sure how much the meter is because my Dad gave me that one.It has been well worth the investment.

I am currently on a low sodium diet and taking a diuretic (last doctor assumed I have MM). I avoid *all *the main triggers for both MM and MAV - chocolate, aspartame, coffee, wine, etc. I stay clear of them. My diet is extremely boring. I still feel like crap 24 hours a day, constantly motion sick. When it is so bad I can’t take it anymore or it gets to the point that I am afraid I will have vertigo, I take either valium, meclizine or ibuprofen. Today I felt so bad I had to take the v and m. And now my head and eyes hurt.

I feel best when I get a good night’s sleep, 8-9 hours or even more. That rarely happens, my norm is 6-7.

I should watch my sugar intake. With all the other dietary limits I seem to ignore this part. Same with wheat which can be a trigger for some.

— Begin quote from "bookworm"

I am currently on a low sodium diet and taking a diuretic (last doctor assumed I have MM). I avoid *all *the main triggers for both MM and MAV - chocolate, aspartame, coffee, wine, etc. I stay clear of them. My diet is extremely boring. I still feel like crap 24 hours a day, constantly motion sick. When it is so bad I can’t take it anymore or it gets to the point that I am afraid I will have vertigo, I take either valium, meclizine or ibuprofen. Today I felt so bad I had to take the v and m. And now my head and eyes hurt.

I feel best when I get a good night’s sleep, 8-9 hours or even more. That rarely happens, my norm is 6-7.

I should watch my sugar intake. With all the other dietary limits I seem to ignore this part. Same with wheat which can be a trigger for some.

— End quote

The mecliine was no help to me whatsoever. I can’t take the ibuprofen because right now I have a small ulceration in my stomach so my doctor does not want me to take either for a couple of weeks at least…I do not have Valium but know some are afraid of it. I have a friend at work whose husband has to be on a very low dosage every day to stop his vertigo symptoms. I know the dangers of the medicine but right now if it would help i might be willing to try it.

I think the sugar intake might help you might be surprised, I know I was very surprised. It is worth a try it will not hurt anything.