Serotonin

Just been reading the science based research on this forum and it mentioned that low levels of serotonin could be the cause for motion sickness. When reading the label of some of the medication it says they are ‘anti serotonin’ so does this mean that taking the medicine the serotonin will reduce even further and therefore cause more motion sickness??? Confused :?

Hi Ang,

slightly digressing here, but I never really understood what motion sickness is… is it when you are in motion e.g. a car, train, bus, and that somehow makes you feal nauseous?

I would describe it as off balanced too when walking or in a car etc. not just feeling sick. I get it all day long just from moving around the house etc.

Do you think anti serotonin means it would reduce seratonin then?

I read too that serotonin has part to play in migraines. I read that lack of serotonin can cause cortical spreading depression in the brain and also can cause blood vessels to expand. Both of these contribute to migraine. SSRI’s and tricyclic antidepressants block the reuptake of serotonin by certain nerve cells in the brain leaving more serotonin available in the brain. This can relieve depression and migraine. The reason the pills can’t just give you serotonin directly is that the body would stop producing its own serotonin if it was simply given it artificially and this is potentially very dangerous to the brain, so instead the drugs are designed to affect the uptake of serotonin instead. I believe that Pizotifen is a serotonin antagonist (works against serotonin) however I am not sure why/how this works in migraine prevention but it certainly appears to for many people. Maybe someone else can help explaining that x

I’m certainly no specialist but just from the way its worded, it certainly sounds like anti serotonin would mean a decrease in serotonin levels

cheers
Rich

Richy I have suffered travel sickness since being a child, certainly well before I developed MAV. If I travel in a car (passenger only, usually on long journeys esp on winding roads or sitting in the back seat or trying to read or look at a map when moving), bus or especially a boat I can start to feel queasy and if I don’t stop or get out then it will turn into severe nausea to the point of being sick. I will feel generally grotty, tired, sickly and turn really pale/slightly green. It is to do with the vestibular system getting conflicting signals whereby your brain is detecting motion but your eyes are not seeing it. That is why it is worse in the back of the car or on a boat, it doesn’t affect me if I’m the driver of a car. It is really not pleasant but quite common I think and especially among those with migraine.

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Thanks Jem for that. Its all a little confusing when I am about to take Pizotifen this evening for first time :? Yeah need to know what serotonin antagonist does to serotonin levels.

Thanks for your replies

Angela

— Begin quote from “Jem”

Richy I have suffered travel sickness since being a child, certainly well before I developed MAV. If I travel in a car (passenger only, usually on long journeys esp on winding roads or sitting in the back seat or trying to read or look at a map when moving), bus or especially a boat I can start to feel queasy and if I don’t stop or get out then it will turn into severe nausea to the point of being sick. I will feel generally grotty, tired, sickly and turn really pale/slightly green. It is to do with the vestibular system getting conflicting signals whereby your brain is detecting motion but your eyes are not seeing it. That is why it is worse in the back of the car or on a boat, it doesn’t affect me if I’m the driver of a car. It is really not pleasant but quite common I think and especially among those with migraine.

— End quote

thanks for the explanation Jem. I certainly am not a sufferer of motion sickness in that case. I feel better when in motion, even if i cant see outside, for example on a plane with the window blinds closed I feel absolutely fine, no symptoms in fact… this is what leads me to believe I may have a MDDS diagnosis also

Well hold on because the really weird thing is I feel a lot better in a moving car when it comes to my dizziness. It masks the feeling of dizziness because I am moving. I haven’t been on a boat or a plane since I got MAV so I am not sure. I can still feel travel sick on long winding car journeys and I am sure I would be seasick if I went on a boat but that would always be the case for me. What I am saying is that my underlying predisposition to travel sickness is still there just the same but now being in motion masks the dizziness I feel 24/7 from MAV. In fact I can have a normal conversation in the car and feel ok. How weird is that!

Richy, I could be totally wrong here but I would have thought the fact that you have never experienced any travel sickness in your life would make you less likely to have Mdds because your vestibular system must not be as sensitive to motion. That’s just a guess though x

— Begin quote from “Jem”

Richy, I could be totally wrong here but I would have thought the fact that you have never experienced any travel sickness in your life would make you less likely to have Mdds because your vestibular system must not be as sensitive to motion. That’s just a guess though x

— End quote

Hi Jem,

I would agree if it wasn’t for the fact I’ve had true Mdds before. Twice after 2 different long boat trips which lasted for around a month each time.

The only reason I’ve not thought this episode was because of Mdds was with it being a spontaneous onset , however from what I have read Mdds can also happen spontaneously after you’ve had a previous episode.

So god knows what’s truly happened.

Oh really, well if you had it before then maybe it is Mdds. If you don’t have a lot of the other migraine symptoms then it is quite probable as another option I would guess x

Im on pitz now as well as an anti-depressant I know Dr S prescribes both. Ive read up on pitzotifen and it wont reduce serotonin it does something to stop you absorbing it but does actually have a mild anti-depressent affect.

This may be the drug that will help you so please give it a try , true MDDS is quite rare I think and most doctors would never diagnose it unless you had recently been on a boat or air travel etc.

HI
There are different serotonin receptors all through out the body. Some of them are responsible for mood, appetite, sleep, anxiety etc…some meds are agonists at certain receptor sites, and some are antagnists at other sites. Each site has it’s own thing going on. A med like Prozac, for instance, just increases the sero in the body and then all the receptors can have access to it. If it is a “selective” serotonin med (SSRI) then only certain sites will recognize it and access it. That is why some people get more anxious in the beginning…the sites that are responsible for anxiety get amped up…eventually, the sites all kind of get on board with it.
A med like Remeron decreases (antagonizes) sero at the sites that cause anxiety…even though it is an antidpressant, and decreasing sero, it is hitting the sites that can cause worsening depression. Like sleep and anxiety…makes sleep better, takes away anxiety etc…
My guess is that if those receptors aren’t able to pick up the sero, the other sero receptors (the ones responsible for mood) have extra. Like if your brother doesn’t eat his dessert, you can get extra!
lol…
It is confusing, but if you Google serotonin receptor sites, it goes into more detail for those who are interested in furthering their understanding.
Kelley

Thanks Kelley I think I understand it a bit. I should stop worrying and just take the bloody tablets :slight_smile: