Vitamins natural remedies B2 ect

for the new people,
jen from oz

Migraines: Your Easy-to-follow 8-step Treatment Plan Can End The Misery Of Migraine Attacks

Date: 01/11/01 Keywords: Nutrition, Stress,
It is estimated that one person in four in the UK suffers from migraine headaches, which affect women more than men.

It is estimated that one person in four in the UK suffers from migraine headaches, which affect women more than men. Migraine attacks are extremely debilitating and can put you out of action for days at a time, causing excruciating pain, nausea and extreme sensitivity to light and sound.

Migraines are not like ordinary headaches, which are caused by tension in the muscles at the back of your head. Instead, they involve changes to the blood vessels in your brain and typically affect one side of your head only. Most researchers believe that narrowing of the arteries in your brain, followed by their over-dilation, is responsible for migraine pain, by stretching the tiny nerves that encircle your blood vessels.

Conventional medicine treats migraines with drugs that alter brain chemistry, relax blood vessels and block pain signals. But these can cause unpleasant side-effects, such as drowsiness, weight gain, chest tightness and sleep disturbance. And yet, this distressing condition can often be completely controlled simply by paying careful attention to your diet, and taking certain nutritional and herbal supplements.

What causes the excruciating pain of migraine symptoms?
Studies indicate that food sensitivity may be linked to as many as 90 per cent of migraines (Lancet ii: 865-9, 1993). The major culprit is cow’s milk, followed closely by wheat, eggs, oranges and tomatoes.

Chemicals called amines, which are present in certain foods as well as being produced in your body, are thought to play a large part in triggering attacks (Rev. Neurol. 129: 534-8, 1996). Foods which contain amines, include figs, dates, raisins, pineapples, beans, potatoes, pork and turkey.

Tyramine is the most notorious dietary amine and high concentrations are found in hard cheeses (especially blue cheese), yoghurt, yeast extract, pickled herrings and canned fish. Chocolate is a common migraine trigger too, the guilty amines here being mainly phenylethylamine and phenylalanine. Some amines which are produced in your body are also present in certain foods - for instance serotonin in bananas, and dopamine and histamine in cheese, sauerkraut and cured meats.

For most people, dietary amines pose no threat, as they are quickly broken down by monoamine oxidase enzymes in your gut and blood platelets. In migraine-sensitive people, however, these enzymes may be deficient. It is thought that naturally occurring chemicals, such as flavonoids in citrus fruits and red wine, may be responsible for preventing these monoamine oxidase enzymes from working properly.

Why the weather could be causing your migraine pain!
Stress, weather changes, smoking and too much or too little sleep can all cause migraine headaches - by triggering hormonal or nervous system changes that affect the production of amines in your body.

Low blood sugar and excess blood insulin levels, as a result of missed meals or sweet snacks, also promote amine production. High oestrogen levels can in turn raise insulin output, leading to migraines linked to the menstrual cycle, the contraceptive pill and HRT.

Bacterial toxins in foods also cause migraines. This may explain the difficulty some sufferers have in identifying specific foods as migraine triggers, since the same food may be well tolerated when fresh, but migraine-producing a few days later when bacteria have multiplied. Artificial additives, such as monosodium glutamate (MSG), sweeteners (particularly aspartame), nitrites and nitrates in cured meats, flavourings and colourings can all cause migraines, too.

Eight ways to help banish migraines for good
Following this nutritional treatment approach can help break the chain of events that leads to painful migraine attacks:

Identify food sensitivities. An exclusion diet that initially eliminates dairy products, wheat and other gluten grains (rye, barley and oats), eggs, oranges and tomatoes will cover about 90 per cent of food sensitivity cases. Keep to this for a month and then, if you haven’t suffered from a migraine in this time, reintroduce one food at a time, allowing four days for a reaction to occur. Meat and animal fats should also be avoided during the elimination diet, since these tend to promote the production of arachidonic acid, which causes pain and inflammation.

Eliminate harmful amine chemicals from your diet. Cut out any amine-containing foods - chocolate, aged cheese, tinned and pickled fish, sauerkraut, dates, figs, raisins, pineapple, bananas and yeast extract.
Cut out caffeine. Caffeine is a bit of a paradox, since it can both cause and relieve migraines. It stimulates adrenaline production, which causes vasoconstriction (narrowing of your arteries), so it can either contribute to the initial phase of a migraine or relieve symptoms temporarily during the second phase, when most of the pain is due to over-dilation of your arteries. It is best, however, to exclude coffee from your diet entirely, in addition to other drinks which contain caffeine, such as tea and fizzy drinks. A gradual reduction is advisable to avoid a withdrawal headache. Drink plenty of water instead, since dehydration leads to histamine release and vasoconstriction, which can trigger migraines. Stay clear of alcohol and tobacco, too.

Eat plenty of fresh foods to avoid the build up of bacteria. Base your diet on the freshest, most natural foods you can obtain. Plan meals and shop frequently, so food doesn’t stay in your fridge for days. Avoid food additives as far as possible, especially nitrites in cured meats, MSG, tartrazine and aspartame.
Balance your blood sugar levels. Follow a low-carbohydrate diet and include plenty of fibre from fresh vegetables and salads. Avoid sweet foods, refined flour products (even if you do not suffer from a wheat sensitivity) and potatoes, as they can cause blood sugar levels to rise fast. A supplement of 200-600mcg of chromium picolinate taken daily can help keep your blood sugar stable.

Correct hormonal imbalances. A natural diet and supplementation with essential fatty acids, B group vitamins (especially B6) and magnesium will help to avoid female sex hormone fluctuations, which can result in migraines. Herbs such as dong quai and agnus castus have also been shown to help (Am. J. Chin. Med 15 (3-4):117-125, 1987). Natural progesterone cream (currently only available on prescription in the UK) has also been shown to prevent menstrual cycle migraines.
Benefit from the healing power of herbs. Feverfew can reduce migraine frequency in about two thirds of cases (Brit. Med. J. 291:569-73, 1985). Cayenne pepper, valerian, goldenseal and ginger have also been used successfully to prevent or treat migraine (Pharm. Rev. 38: 179-226, 1986; J. Ethnopharmacol 29(3), 1990). But be careful to avoid St John’s Wort if you are a migraine sufferer, since it blocks the action of monoamine oxidase enzymes that break down amines.
Natural relief for migraines. Magnesium and calcium can reduce the severity of blood vessel spasms and prevent the onset of a migraine. Vitamins B2, B3, B6, C and E can also help and appear to work by preventing vasoconstriction or inhibiting blood platelet clumping, which occur during attacks. Essential fatty acids in fish oils reduce the production of inflammatory prostaglandins, which contribute to migraine pain.

Simply altering your diet and taking the natural remedies outlined above, can help prevent migraines - meaning that you don’t have to live under the constant fear of the next attack.

More articles here. :roll:
thehealthierlife.co.uk/natur … 00581.html

**I’ve started another vitamin trial two weeks ago, after my unsuccessful topamax trial, :frowning:
Which ended in misery, my blood pressure rose so high, it gave me the worst migraines, I’ve ever had in my life, had me in the ER and not able to walk for days on end.

Just this week, I’m seeing a difference.
The B2 400mg a day and high potency vit B sups are giving me a lovely relaxed feeling, better than I ever had with xanax , with no side effects, that’s a bonus.

Has anyone heard of Chromium Picolinate GTF for migraine , I’ve read some good and very bad stuff about it, something from wikipedia which was pretty daming, some people swear by it, saying it broke their migraine cycle.
It helps to control blood sugars.

I was suprised to read about the st John wart not helping at all with migraines?
wow.

jen**

— Begin quote from “jennyd”

**I’ve started another vitamin trial two weeks ago, after my unsuccessful topamax trial, :frowning:
Which ended in misery, my blood pressure rose so high, it gave me the worst migraines, I’ve ever had in my life, had me in the ER and not able to walk for days on end.

Just this week, I’m seeing a difference.
The B2 400mg a day and high potency vit B sups are giving me a lovely relaxed feeling, better than I ever had with xanax , with no side effects, that’s a bonus.
**
Sorry to hear that :frowning: Hadn’t you been on topa for a long time with success??

Regarding the B2, if you don’t mind me asking: where did you get it? I’ve only found 100mg pills which contain gelatin.

— End quote

Australia, Brand Natures own.
100mg take 4 tabs a day.
jen

Life Extension (lef.org) makes a powdered form of B2. You get used to the taste. Or, if you buy B2 in capsules, just pour them out, pour them on food, or in water and drink them down. Tastes like metal. But worth it.

Julie

Hi Jenny,

But be careful to avoid St John’s Wort if you are a migraine sufferer, since it blocks the action of monoamine oxidase enzymes that break down amines.

This is very true and I’ve learned the hard way. Since bumping up my dose of this stuff 2.5 months ago I have been feeling worse than ever though I didn’t attribute it to a small increase. On Sunday I dropped the dose back by 25% and WHAT A DIFFERENCE. Today I felt the best I have since before the Canada trip. There’s been an incremental improvement in everything since Sunday. I can’t believe I have been doing myself in all this time. I’m really moving full force into getting this stuff out of my system entirely and onto this program.

Scott 8)

Hmmmm. I just re-read this, and noted:

— Begin quote from ____

For most people, dietary amines pose no threat, as they are quickly broken down by monoamine oxidase enzymes in your gut and blood platelets. In migraine-sensitive people, however, these enzymes may be deficient.

— End quote

I’m not sure if there’s any scientific merit to that claim, as MAO deficiency appears rare and most articles talking about it is about people with major anger issues… However, IF it’s true, it would certainly explain why I seem to not tolerate even low doses of serotonin-increasing meds. (SSRI + MAOI (which decrease MAO activity) for example, almost always lead to major serotonin syndrome, with a likely death if untreated!).
A minor MAO deficiency would lead to more serotonin being available, and increasing the output (which my meds do) would lead to too high levels much easier than it would in a person with normal MAO activity.

(Why? MAO, Monoamine Oxidase, is an enzyme that breaks down monoamines - such as serotonin, noradrenalin, dopamine, tyramine, histamine etc etc. Which is why people on MAOIs must have a virtually amine-free diet to not get potentially lethal symptoms from the overload you get since they aren’t broken down properly. So, if migraine patients have a small deficiency, then it would make A LOT of sense that we are also sensitive to dietary amines!)

I get my B2 in tablet form here:

vitaminshoppe.com/search/en/ … image.y=11

Kim

Oh Scott how we live and learn hey?
good on you, lets hope things pick up for you now.
I really am having less migraines on the B2 ect…
I must have needed it. :smiley:
I suppose time will tell with my next (time of the month) that’s when I crash big time.

Tran, sorry I didnt answer your question , I must have been somewhere else in my head, as usaul! :mrgreen:
topa in the first month only gave me a sence of wellbeing, much like some antidepressants, I felt my visaul problems really clear up, I could consentrate on more than one thing, reading was easier, but I suppose like most meds, it had too many down sides or lets say side effects, **chronic anxiety **, blood pressure probs for me , just not my med I suppose.
it never stopped my migraine. and I was on it a long time , from the 10th of june.
I suppose topas like any med, it dosnt always last or keep helping.
for myself that was the case.
jen

Jen,

Did I misunderstand, or wasn’t it during the entire time you were at 50 mg that you also had no rocking at all, along with the feelings of peace, and it wasn’t until you decided to increase your dose and go up to 100 mg that you started having extremely intolerable SEs? I’m just trying to get the story straight, because that’s what I thought you were communicating to me at the time.

I’ve heard of neurologic meds pooping out after using them at the same dose, and i’ve heard of them not working after changing doses and going back again to the dose that once worked.

Just more griss for the mill.

Julie

No julie that’s wrong.
I started on June the 10th at 1/4 of a pill, slowly built my way up to 25 mg for many months, before I ever reached 50mg.
I never went Higher on topa until many months of having migraines return , during my periods,.
after increasing the dose found all the symptoms too much to bear.
under my GP’s care, and my neuroloist care, who told me to get off of it.

are you still on topa, I know you also have said you have tapered down on the topa, or are you off it now?

jen

No, i’m still on topa and it’s still working wonders for me! Don’t anybody ever try to take my topa from me!

Julie

Jen,

I think I finally understand. your migraines started breaking through during your periods. That makes sense. Topa wasn’t doing it for you all the way, so they were breaking through when your system was weak. None of my preventatives do it for me all the way, that’s why i keep adding one on top of another, as many people do. But that doesn’t mean any one of them is failing me, or that I should go up on dose on any one of them.

I remember seeing a video by Kira’s MAV doctor at Mass Eye and Ear - he said that nobody finds a preventative combo that does it all - he believes that we all end up needing a vestibular suppressant of some kind in order to lead a normal life.

Julie

That’s correct Julie,

topa wasn’t doing it all the way ,was only part of my problem.
It was giving me worsening of migraines on the doses; I needed to stop my migraine.
I ended up in the ER every other day, with stroke like symptoms and couldn’t walk for hours on end,
Remember I told you about it?

The SE’s for me were shocking.
I know you love topa, but I hated it.
I did a very thorough job with my trial, I was careful thoughtful and patient.
I had to weigh up, if a drug was making me worse, it did so I went off it.

klonopin has too many dangers and side effects , that I don’t want.
Mood swings, addiction, dependence… ect… with long term use.
Maybe at the time, If I was taking klonopin every day, I could have endured the SE’s of topa hell.

Most antidepressants that are available for me at present give me insomnia, tachycardia and or higher blood pressure. Which rule out many of these meds,
So until those things are under control, I 'll have to wait.

neurontin gave me chest infections, and made me sleepy all day,(zombified) at only 300mg
I was on it for many months before going off it.
topamax nearly killed me.
zoloft gave me insomnia for 6 months
trycilics dothep, helps me, I know that through experience, but I have Tachycardia, so it makes it worse.

When I PM you about my topa trial, you tried to tell me I’d made errors in my topa trial,
You were assuming that my trial wasn’t done in the right way,
Topa is a migraine preventative, which works wonders for many people,

Maybe my vertigo symptoms are coming from another source, as we’ve been discussing lately,
And maybe, that’s why topa didn’t carry through for me.

It’s a personal thing, as we’ve discussed, every Mav’er is different.

Thanks for your input, and being there for me, during my topa mess.

jen

Hi Gang,

I think the take-home message is that Topamax is not for everyone. Period. I can vouch for this first hand as it turned my world upside down within 48 hours. I’ve never been through that sort of psychological weirdness in my life and thank God it vanished quickly (note: I can’t be certain that SJW somehow created the reaction with Topa but I’m not going back to find out). The problems associated with Topamax are acknowledged by the FDA:

— Begin quote from ____

In January the FDA announced that a review of 199 studies comparing 11 epilepsy drugs to placebos found that patients taking the drugs had about twice the risk of suicidal behavior compared with patients taking a placebo. With almost 44,000 patients in the studies, four people taking antiepileptic drugs committed suicide while none of the patients receiving a placebo did.

According to a letter issued September 26, 2001, by the manufacturing company, Ortho-McNeil Pharmaceutical, Inc., there have been 23 reported cases (considered to be substantially under reported) of the development of an ocular syndrome characterized by acute myopia and secondary angle closure glaucoma (FDA). Symptoms, which typically onset in the first month of use, include blurred vision and ocular pain. An eye exam may also find myopia, anterior chamber shallowing, redness, increased intraocular pressure and possibly extended dilation of the pupil (FDA).

— End quote

On the other hand it works miracles for some with MAV. My brother’s wife takes it for migraine only – a high dose – and she feels zero side effects. Definitely worth a try for anyone with MAV but go into it knowing it may not pan out and that there are possible side effects that are very nasty.

Best … Scott 8)

Scott,

I’ve complained about Topa almost as much as anybody else, but it works for me, so i keep taking it. I’ve been extremely lucky regarding SEs with all the preventatives I take. On the other hand, I get some amount of improvement at the lower doses. But if you add that up, it’s got me living an active life, even if i am still mainly housebound.

Julie