Would someone please explain

Does migraine actually damage the vestibular system? I’ve read “Heal Your Headache” by Dr. Buchholz and understand the migraine mechanism and the symptoms it causes. But in reading comments from people who are being or have been treated for MAV, it seems many still experience imbalance and dizziness. Unless there is a vestibular problem, shouldn’t those symptoms go away once migraine is controlled? Or is that just a part of the baseline condition? Someone help me understand, please. Thanks.

Apparently migraine events can cause scar like damage to the vestibular system

VRT is used to get over this

One thing that helped me accept the migraine diagnosis was/is the huge difference between my pre topamax and post topamax vestibular issues. I still have other symptoms and am not at 100% but the difference was marked…so since I didn’t have normal migraine symptoms but, migraine treatment made a difference then…migraine it is :?

Hi, I asked Dr Silver this question as I was concerned migraine could cause permanent vestibular damage. He said that it wouldn’t. I did however read somewhere that it could.

As you can see there are differences of opinion so I really am not quite sure myself! It may be that Dr. Silver could see how much of a nervous wreck the MAV was making me and didn’t want me worrying about it so took the gentle approach??!! Going to trust Dr Silver on this one!
X x

this was taken from Dizzytimes.com

Thomas E. Boismier, MPH
Director of the Balance Center at Ear, Nose & Throat Associates, PC, Fort Wayne, IN

Mr. Boismier has 25 years of experience in clinical and research aspects of balance and vestibular science. He was directly involved in the startup of 3 successful comprehensive balance centers, and has consulted on several others. He has taught balance testing to professionals nationwide and abroad, including a 1995 teaching secondment in Addenbrooke’s NHS Trust Hospital at Cambridge University, UK.

‘‘Migraine events can also cause permanent scar-like damage to the peripheral and/or central vestibular system when migranous vasospasms deprive it of oxygen. In the second case balance symptoms can persist even after the underlying migraine condition has been calmed down if the compensation process gets stuck. We find the combination of comprehensive migraine control and formal VRT to be highly effective.’’

ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19692938

ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23182929

ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23145969

ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16419697

ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10983955

Vestibular migraine can also be accompanied by BPPV.

ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15724736

ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17135456

Maybe depends on how quickly the issue is determined to be, and therefore is treated as migraine–thus limiting the ongoing spasms and “damaging” effects.

I’m a determined and hardheaded patient. Doctors tell me I’m nuts, first thing I do is look 'em in the eye and tell 'em to go to a firey place–then go look for a doctor that will help me figure out what’s going on. If you KNOW you are having physical symptoms that aren’t normal–stick to your guns and get the help you deserve!!!

(She says from her spoiled US perspective).

Thank you, all, for your comments and explanations, and for the links, hillsta. I’m trying the migraine diet and hope to at least cut down on the actual headaches and vertigo episodes. Getting rid of the imbalance would be a surprise but a welcome change.

Wishing each of you good, stable, symptom-free days.