Possibility of MAV?

A couple of weeks ago I started getting a tingling sensation in both sides of my face and in my hands. This started as intermittent and then progressed to being almost constant along with pressure in my head and a disconnected, light headed feeling in my head. My GP referred me to a neurologist who told me all my physical tests and blood tests were normal and to come back in a few months if I still have the symptoms.

Today I also started getting vertigo quite badly, feeling as though the floor was moving up and down significantly. I also used to suffer abdominal migraines as a child and do get headaches sometimes but nothing I would call extremely painful. I have also noticed that I occasionally get a flash of a circle of gold light at the outside of my left eye.

Could I possibly have MAV just without the migraine headaches? I am going to mention it to my dr but thought someone might recognise this group of symptoms as I kinda get the feeling my dr thinks I’m a hypochondriac.

Thanks

Cindy

Hi and welcome Ausgurl,

Short answer - yes. Sounds exactly like migraine. As your doctor(s) have ruled out other problems it seems a pretty safe bet - the sensation of rocking is a very tell tale sign, as is your history of migraine and the visual disturbances.

Check out the MAV survival guide here: http://mvertigo.cloudapp.net/t/vestibular-migraine-survival-guide-2014/2244

Are you in Australia?

Vic

Thanks Vic

Yes, I am in Brisbane. Not sure if migraines can just start like this? As I said I used to have what the dr called abdominal migraines but that was when I was a kid so there seems to be a big gap between then and now? Also, I can’t work out what is a trigger for me as it seems to be very random but consistent if that makes sense?

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Thanks Vic

Yes, I am in Brisbane. Not sure if migraines can just start like this? As I said I used to have what the dr called abdominal migraines but that was when I was a kid so there seems to be a big gap between then and now? Also, I can’t work out what is a trigger for me as it seems to be very random but consistent if that makes sense?

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Migraine can start out of nowhere. I’m not kidding - one minute fine, next second feel like a switch has been flicked and your world is ending.

Don’t be fazed/thrown by the gap in time. Migraine changes over time.

Some people have triggers, others don’t. Even if you do have triggers they won’t necessarily provoke a migraine every time. Changes in barometric pressure are bad for me but I don’t migraine during every storm. I can’t avoid storms anyway. Sigh. If your triggers are food then you obviously have much more control.

The lovely JennyD is from Brisbane, she might be able to recommend a good doc for you to see. I’m in Sydney where I’ve seen Dr Halmagyi, who is something of a guru in the migraine world.

Check out the MAV survival guide here for some really good pointers on how to manage it: http://mvertigo.cloudapp.net/t/vestibular-migraine-survival-guide-2014/2244

Vic

I got abdominal migraine as a child and car sickness. Nothing much else in my teens, but occasionally had the flashing gold zig zag lights but never associated them with migraine, I just had a few mild heads. Late teens, after red wine at a party, woke with a full blown vertigo attack. Eventually the full blown painful migraines started.

Christine

Many with migraine never have headaches or auras or any of the stereotypical symptoms. Here’s some of the other things that it can do…

"Not only is the term “migraine” misleading when it’s used to designate one specific type of headache, but even the term “headache” is inadequate to cover the full spectrum of discomfort generated by the migraine mechanism. Discomfort may be felt anywhere in or around the face or neck as well as the head. Words such as “ache” and “pain” may not even begin to capture the discomfort you feel as a result of migraine.

Instead, in or around your head you may experience pressure, fullness, tightness, heaviness, thickness, numbness or soreness, or you may have swelling, burning, buzzing, vibrating, boring, piercing, drawing, expanding, tingling, trickling, bubbling, crawling, shifting, or rushing sensations. These sensations may be aggravated by bending over, straining, sneezing, coughing or exertion, or if you shake or jar your head.

You may have feelings suggestive more of lack of clarity than discomfort, such as cloudiness, dullness, fogginess, or fuzzy-headedness. Discomfort may be excrutiating, trivial, or anything inbetween…The severe headaches conventionally labeled “migraines” occupy a relatively narrow band at the far end of the spectrum."


"Normally your vestibular system controls your balance by means of the fluid-filled semicircular canals in the inner ear. These peripheral sensors are connected by nerves to certain pathways and centers in the brain stem and elsewhere in the brain, and when vestibular function is disturbed by migraine, it may be felt as unsteadiness, loss of equilibrium (like just getting off a boat), being off-balance, veering, swaying, falling, rocking, vertigo (a spinning sensation) -or just vague, nonspecific dizziness, lightheadedness, or wooziness.

Symptoms of migraine, especially these vestibular symptoms, are sometimes trigger-specific. Just as sunlight glare or a flashbulb going off in your face may specifically provoke a classic visual aura of flashing lights, so may the vestibular stimulation of moving your head rapidly or into a certain position cause vestibular symptoms of migraine. It has long been recognized that car sickness and other motion-induced ills are commonly related to migraine and reflect the heightened vestibular sensitivity of certain individuals, courtesy of their relatively low migraine thresholds.

As with all other neurological symptoms of migraine, vestibular symptoms can be transient or persistent and can occur with or without headache or other accompanying discomfort. The site of migraine-related blood vessel constriction causing dizziness can be either in the inner ear or in the vestibular pathways and centers of the brain. The term “basilar migraine” is applied to intense episodes of migraine involving profound vertigo, imbalance, loss of consciousness and other symptoms arising from constriction of the basilar artery, which supplies the brain stem."

Heal Your Headache, by David Buchholz

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… I have also noticed that I occasionally get a flash of a circle of gold light at the outside of my left eye…

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That sounds like a migraine aura.