Tinnitus in MAV? / sound in silent rooms

Anyone ever have the experience of having a room be SO QUIET that it’s noisy? Like when the power goes out and there’s nothing running at all; or when everyone’s asleep at midnight; or in a parked, turned-off car in the middle of an empty area; etc.

This is what happens to me: There’s an extremely faint constant “whine,” sort of like microphone feedback, but 1/1000 as loud, at a constant tone, and higher-pitched. Ever heard someone blow a dog whistle – supposedly it’s inaudible, but you could just barely hear it? That’s sort of it. Except it’s like a fraction of a decibel. It’s not even a ringing, it’s just an ever-present, sound-like auditory perception. It’s louder if I press my fingers to my ears.

I think I’ve had this all my life. Years ago, without a fan on, I couldn’t sleep – the absolute silence made me hear “it.” It only happens in soundless scenarios and is so faint that it’s almost like not hearing anything. An audiology test came out fine, and I have no hearing problems at all, never had.

In short (OK, long), is this a normal “thing” that happens to most people in lack of other auditory input, or is it unusual? And moreso, does tinnitus come into play in migraineurs, or does this reopen the door to other dizzy disorders?

Sorry, but I’m apparently in some sort of paranoid state or something tonight!

What you are describing is tinnitus. I have had tinnitus since I was eleven. It came on suddenly. I hear it mostly in quiet situations, although it is louder than what you have described. It’s pretty common. People have it who do not have a vestibular disorder. It can sometimes be caused by too much loud noise/music. It often doesn’t affect hearing at all. I think people who do not have it hear silence.

My tinnitus gets louder intermittently, generally when my migraine is most active and my symptoms are worse.

I definitely wouldn’t worry about it or question your diagnosis based upon it. Lots of people with lots of different vestibular disorders have or acquire tinnitus. It is often one of the diagnostic criteria for menieres but this is in tandem with other symptoms - for example associated hearing loss at a particular tone and a sensation of fullness in either one or both ears.

Hope that helps,

H

Tinnitus is extremely common. I have it and so does every friend I know. Most however doesn’t have it over a “sometimes bothersome” level. For me it’s usually very low but goes up when my symptoms goes up and also with lack of sleep, a cold etc. In other words totally normal and expected…

What I have experienced however (that never happened prior to this crap), is that I can a sudden vibrating feeling/sound in my ears and head. Its like a very low hum that makes my head and ears vibrate (feels almost like a lowpitched echo going through my ears and brain), and it goes away after like 10 seconds.

I think in the midst of all of whatever else is the matter with me I have developed a form of this as I sometimes having the ringing in my ear/ears from time to time but over the last few months I now have what I refer to a a pulsating tinnitus and it seems that this harder to get someone to diagnosis as it is treated differently than normal tinnitus. When I look up information on it says to find a specialist that is familiar with the circulatory system to help with this so does this mean I now have to find another doctor to treat this condition…or would someone familiar with Mav have a clue about this problem.

This pulsating that is happening in my ear or head is really troublesome as it has gotten as bothersome as the dizziness over the last few weeks.

Does anyone else have this or any information on who might know what do about it…

Hi George,

I’ve got tinnitus and also get auditory hallucinations occasionally when I’m lying in bed early in the morning. If I’m symptomatic, I’ll hear a dog suddenly bark or a whistle go off – sometimes a fire cracker. Happens once a month. Different foods can affect my tinnitus too. If I eat those crappy processed buns on McDonald’s burgers etc, it can cause me to wake with a really high-pitched tone in the middle of the night. For the most part, I don’t notice the tinnitus at all. It’s one of those things that gets worse if you focus on it.

Cheers … Scott 8)

Timeless - Here’s one idea. Just putting it out there…

Dr. Hain mentions a thing called “benign intracranial hypertension.” However, that’s probably not the case, as he says it most often occurs in females who are significantly overweight. The test for this is a lumbar puncture. In this disorder, says one article, “the headache is initially episodic then usually progresses over weeks to daily headache with features typical of raised intracranial pressure.”

The flipside is that it could be CAUSED by migraine, which can cause vasospasm. Hain again: “While in the past Migraine was felt to be related to vasospasm, presently it is thought that the blood flow changes are not primary. Instead, it is felt that Migraine is related to abnormal sensitivity to sensory inputs. Nevertheless, there is recent evidence in the other direction – migraine is associated with a mutation in a gene that controls a potent vasoconstrictor.”

Hain speaks specifically of pulsatile tinnitus on one page. Go to this link:
dizziness-and-balance.com/di … nnitus.htm
Look for the section “Vascular problems causing tinnitus – pulsatile tinnitus.” Further down the page is a section marked “Special tests for pulsatile tinnitus.”

So, from what I understand (or think I do) about this, it sounds like migraine can cause pulsatile tinnitus, but migraine, dizziness, and P.T. can also all be SYMPTOMS of something else like intracranial hypertension. Unfortunately, I don’t know which of these scenarios to guess at, and both ideas could be wrong in your case. I’d take matters to your neurologist and see if he thinks you should have some testing done for P.T., as it could indicate a different problem (Hain adds that “benign” in “benign intracranial hypertension” is a poor choice of words).

Thanks Scott.

As many have been before me, I’m a bit anxious about this, but it looks like it’s time for me to “take the Effexor plunge.”

Then again, a while back, I took sertraline/Zoloft – an SSRI – for a few months and went up to ~100 mg without difficulty, so that gives me some hopefulness that I won’t have a poor reaction to an SNRI. (I wonder whether it’s the serotonin increase or the norepinephrine increase that makes some people react so poorly to Effexor? Or a combination thereof?)

Dr. Hain says explicitly that he favors venlafaxine for the visual-dependence symptom.

I’m not completely clear on the entire meaning of that, though. In your opinion, does “visual dependence” fit what I’ve been complaining of? (Non-vertiginous, non-dizziness lightheadedness in relation to self-movement, head-turning, perception of others’ movement, and too much visual input / focal points. But general tolerance of driving, LCD screens and dark rooms.) I’m REALLY curious…!

— Begin quote from "georgekoch"

Timeless - Here’s one idea. Just putting it out there…

Dr. Hain mentions a thing called “benign intracranial hypertension.” However, that’s probably not the case, as he says it most often occurs in females who are significantly overweight. The test for this is a lumbar puncture. In this disorder, says one article, “the headache is initially episodic then usually progresses over weeks to daily headache with features typical of raised intracranial pressure.”

The flipside is that it could be CAUSED by migraine, which can cause vasospasm. Hain again: “While in the past Migraine was felt to be related to vasospasm, presently it is thought that the blood flow changes are not primary. Instead, it is felt that Migraine is related to abnormal sensitivity to sensory inputs. Nevertheless, there is recent evidence in the other direction – migraine is associated with a mutation in a gene that controls a potent vasoconstrictor.”

Hain speaks specifically of pulsatile tinnitus on one page. Go to this link:
dizziness-and-balance.com/di … nnitus.htm
Look for the section “Vascular problems causing tinnitus – pulsatile tinnitus.” Further down the page is a section marked “Special tests for pulsatile tinnitus.”

So, from what I understand (or think I do) about this, it sounds like migraine can cause pulsatile tinnitus, but migraine, dizziness, and P.T. can also all be SYMPTOMS of something else like intracranial hypertension. Unfortunately, I don’t know which of these scenarios to guess at, and both ideas could be wrong in your case. I’d take matters to your neurologist and see if he thinks you should have some testing done for P.T., as it could indicate a different problem (Hain adds that “benign” in “benign intracranial hypertension” is a poor choice of words).

— End quote

Well I am not overweight that is for sure in fact I could use putting on a few pounds. I explained this to my doctor today and he wants another MRI of the brain done to check this further…I just wa t to know exactly what it is and if anything can be done to stop it and could this be causing all my issues or is this an additional symptom to go with the MAV.

My Pulsatile tinnitus isnt really tinnitus, its the sound caused by my muscles tensing in sync with some sort of beat (possibly the heartbeat). Especially if I wear earplugs the pulsing is strong, and also with my head against the pillow. If I lie on the floor the sensation is very similar to being in a (“older”) train going over the track, dadam, dadam, dadam etc. Lying in bed I feel it in my back and back of the head, but I can always feel it simply py putting my thumb and indexfinger together. If someone were to measure my muscles I think they would get some strange readings.

This I think is quite common here, no?

— Begin quote from "MikaelHS"

My Pulsatile tinnitus isnt really tinnitus, its the sound caused by my muscles tensing in sync with some sort of beat (possibly the heartbeat). Especially if I wear earplugs the pulsing is strong, and also with my head against the pillow.

— End quote

I have the exact same thing, but I don’t any muscles are involved, it could just as well be a small blood vessel in the ear pushing against something, etc. And yep, I can feel my pulse in strange places. When I “have a migraine” (worse than the 24/7 ones) I can feel it in my legs at times, really weird. That’s without actually touching them, of course. Just as I could count my heart beats by looking at my neck in the mirror yesterday, although that might be a bit closer to normal. :slight_smile:

I found two interesting links concerning pulsatile tinnitus i wonder if this could be the cause of any of pulsating issues…

ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/1719 … stractPlus

ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/1919 … rom=pubmed