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Vestibular Migraine Q&A with Neuro Specialist Dr.Shin Beh

Dr Shin is the Author of ‘Victory Over Vestibular Migraine: The ACTION Plan for Healing & Getting Your Life Back’.

A neurologist, Dr. Beh is the founding Director of UT Southwestern’s Vestibular Neurology and Neuro-Visual Disorders Clinic and serves on the faculty of the Multiple Sclerosis and Neuroimmunology Clinic.

Dr. Beh’s research interests include vestibular migraine, and various other neuro-otologic disorders.

He has published a number of scholarly articles and book chapters and presented nearly 40 abstracts and invited lectures related to his specialty.

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Dr Beh wrote the new VM book.

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Yea , same guy… i love it when he says treating migraine is like french cooking you add a little bit of different meds !

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Agreed @GetBetter! Along with the "pinch of this and pinch of that " hand motions :rofl: He has a great personality which is not always easy to find in a physician. Great link!

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What a pleasant guy. I forgive him for making me feel bad about the ‘easy to treat’ thing. He said 90% of his patients get better. That’s a good number.

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one more video with Dr.Beh by Dizzy cook

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he also said postpartum is a common time for VM to come up… I can attest that!

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Dr. Beh is my doctor. He’s awesome! I don’t want to sound melodramatic, but he helped me get my life back. No joke.

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Ask him to check out this site!

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Awesome. Curious whats your cocktail of meds ?

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100mg trokendi 30 mg amitriptylene

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another topomax win :slight_smile:

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yep, but the other is actually nortriptylene, not amitrtriptylene. My daughter is on ami. I can’t keep her and my migraine drugs straight. How sad is that? Maybe we should move out of our house - I wonder if there is something in the walls… ? :upside_down_face:

That said, Dr. Beh helped me go from miserable to fully functioning again - at work, coaching my kids’ teams, exercising, doing everything I want to do. Can’t say enough good things. It was a process. First visit I got a lot better, but it took 3-4 visits and incremental change to go from awful and a major loss of function and missing out on life to being probably 95-98% of what I was before this thing hit.

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does you daughter Ami for migraine as well ? if so then there is something in the genes !

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Yep. Hers are abdominal migraines. Mine are vestibular. Neither of us has the good old fashioned headache migraine. Pretty weird. I never had a problem until after I turned 40. She started having problems at age 10.

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I wish I could have him as a doctor. Unfortunately, he doesn’t see international patients :disappointed:

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Pretty typical from all I’ve read not to mention my own experience. I had abdominal migraines as a young girl though they were called sick headaches in those days then they stopped completely from menarche until menopause only to return as Vestibular Migraine, no headaches. It’s a recognised pattern.

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Not melodramatic at all to anyone with VM… we understand completely! He truly seems like a good soul! :blue_heart:

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Thanks for posting. Not going to have time to watch the whole thing but for those that have… I’m super curious what he says about the typical timeline for recovery? Or maybe he doesn’t address this. I’ve been reading his book and though it’s not perfect I would recommend it.

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I don’t remember him saying anything about a timeline in the book. I think it’s extremely variable. Maybe some get lucky, get an accurate diagnosis on the first try and manage to get the right med for them the first try. I’d say that timeframe is maybe six months. The average seems to be 2-3 years. For some of us it’s decades.

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